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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the thing that is really holding the economy back? if so then you had a bad week. >> first jobs report of the year. >> fourth quarter gdp numbers are down. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> government spending does actually help the economy. >> a trillion dollar stimulus bill, supposed to create jobs. >> we need to start solving the actual problem. >> we need to cut spending. >> cutting. >> cutting very popular social insurance programs. medicaid, medicare, social security, health care. >> there is another economic reason why we need reform. >> let's help to build the greatest economic engine the world has ever known. >> as congress gets ready to tackle the immigration, there will be a snag. >> the republican party can't move forward. >> doesn't want to do anything on comprehensive immigration reform. >> what would you do about immigration? >> how to deal with border security. >> first we strengthen the borders. >> they have to be reasonable how they do it. >> we define ourselves as a nation of immigrants. >> the economy is back in the spotlight. >> government does help th
. >> i want to -- you look at all the numbers we got this week, the gdp report, the economy technically shrinking by 0.1 for the fourth quarter and most of it being chalked up to government -- to the lack of government spending particularly in the defense industry. and yet there were other parts of it in the private sector that looked strong. what's the reality here? are we an economy that's growing, that's recovering, or are we in an economy that's still on shaky ground? >> we're growing and we're recovering. the economy as measured by, say, gdp, that's kind of the economy's bottom line, that's the value of all the things we produce, that's been going 2%, 2.5%, and i don't think it's changed, that's about what we're growing right now. that's okay. but it's certainly not good enough in the context of the 7%, now 7.9% unemployment rate. yes, the economy is growing. yes, with each passing month we're on more sound ground but, you know, i don't think anyone's going to feel really good until unemployment is below 6%. >> and the big issue continues, one of the odd issues has to be consumer c
economy, and the influence of our diplomacy and the creative energy of our people remain unrivaled. no, it is because as the world has changed, so to have a level -- the levers of power that can most effectively shape international affairs. i have come to think about it like this. truman and acheson were killed in the parthenon with classical geometry and clear lines. tellers or a handful of big institutions and alliances dominated by major powers. that structure delivered unprecedented peace and prosperity. time takes its toll, even on the greatest edifice. we do need a new architecture for this new world. more frank gehry than formal greek. some of his work at first might appear have howser. in fact, it is highly intentional -- half hazard. in fact, it is highly intentional and sophisticated. today, we need a dynamic mix of materials and structures. american military and economic strength will remain the foundation of our global leadership. as we saw from the intervention to stop the massacre in libya to the rate at brought osama bin laden to justice, there will always be times when
to see how they characterize the economy, whether they are getting more comfortable with it now that we have the biggest piece of the fiscal cliff out of the way or whether they are still concerned that employment is sluggish an inflation is tracking kind of low. >> yeah. i mean, we have an economic that's improving but not necessarily gangbusters here to necessarily illustrate or justify this huge movement to stocks. ryan dietrich, what's your take on this in terms of technical strategy? what do the charts look like you to? >> we ton to see what's happened this year and see a lot of similars with last year. we rallied virtually 45 degrees until april and seeing a lot of thins. early in the year, a lot of bulls come in, stocks in mutual funds. doesn't mean the market has to peak. a lot of people are saying that. seasonality-wisebrua usually strong when you have a strong january and march and april, the two strongest months the last five years, up 3.5% on afternoon. all in all coupled with the pact that short interest currently on s&p 500 components is actually higher right now and trimm
. we still have a risk to the economy. i don't see us heading off to a robust, fast recovery. i think 2013 will be better than 2012. i wish i could tell you that it would be really good because that's what we need. >> i don't call myself an economist. i specialize in economic policy. i try to be a good consumer of other forecasts. one thing i learned from that is frankly i don't trust any macro forecast that goes beyond six months. i don't think -- they are just guessing beyond that. i think we probably -- at least i would have similar reactions. i am still concerned about the risks posed by europe. i'm still quite concerned about the risks from things heating up in the middle east. the u.s. economy is repairing itself. we don't have at significant housing drag that we did a year or two ago. balance sheets are repairing. yes, things seem to be heading in the right direction. but i also think that people often make the mistake of confusing the level for the growth rate. i think we need to understand that even if the economy grows at 2% or 3% this year which seems to be the optimistic b
's economy, few families have a stay-at-home mother. in fact, 71% of mothers today are in the labor force. they are major contributors to their family's income. two-thirds of mothers bring home at least a quarter of their family's earning, and more than four of ten families with children, a woman is the majority, or sole breadwinner. that means in today's economy, when a mother earns less than her male colleagues, her family -- her family -- must sacrifice basic necessities as well as facing greater difficulty for these kids to save for college, affording a home, living the american dream. and the lifetime of earnings -- earning losses that all women face, including those women without children or whose children are growing up affects not only their well-being during their working lives, as i said earlier, their ability to save and have a decent retirement. now the evidence shows that discrimination accounts for much of the pay act. in fact, according to one study, when you look at all the reasons that there is a wage gap, well, we have rates 2.4%, 3.5% union status, labor force experienc
from how people personally did but how does it into the economy? guest: we are seeing an economy that is recovering slowly from the crisis and recession of 2008 and 2009. we can put a number of side for a minute because that is about investment income. even over the long time horizon, we are seeing incomes rise. people are earning more money. people are starting to put people back to work. certainly, this is not a happy days are here again and everything is fine. we are not healed but it is making progress in that direction. host: take a look at a lot of factors. it look at wages and income and rental income. you look at investment income as a whole. that paints a picture of where americans are financially. guest: that's right. you can't buy the things you need if you don't have income. for some, that is a paycheck from their job or from retirees, social security benefits. or for people who have invested a lot, it might be invested -- investment income dividends. wherever it comes from, that is the core of how you buy the things you need and want. host: our guests will take a loo
numbers announced yesterday. the economy added 150,000 new jobs, but the unemployment rate ticked up to 7.9%, which is what we have there on our map this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times -- on our map. this was also the lead story in this morning's new york times. patrick, explain how that works, more jobs added, but the unemployment rate goes up. guest: the economy needs to add up -- needs to create enough jobs to make up for people coming into the labour market. this month, we fell slightly short of getting there. it is worth noting, the unemployment rate has a margin for error of 0.2%. when it picks up a 0.1%, we say, it is essentially unchanged. there is a wiggle room for measurements. it is right around par. host: when these numbers come out, the numbers come out, and there is an explanation that they can be adjusted in a month or so down the road trips -- road. guest: tell us about -- as more data comes in, debris-estimate how many jobs came in, and for december, they went from 155,000 jobs to 196,000 jobs. and in november, job growth was showing 146,000 jobs
was part byhe ft tha it was a rigged election, an illegitimate economy. the clip i wanted you to show was the one in which he said, he was asked about the policy of containment. it was not a bad during issue. he says, yes, i support the administration's policy of containment. he then gets a note that says, i have been told that i made a mistake. of course i am not in support of that. a policy of this administration on containment is that it does t have a policy of containment. at whi poi democratic senator levin had to rescue him and said, in fact, the administration has a policy of containment, and it is to oppose it. he was clueless. >> colby? >> he was in the position where he had to dodge a little bit. let's go back to the exchange with senator mccain on the surge. the issue was never the surge when you talk about iraq. the issue, as senator nelson from florida said, going into iraq because we thought there were weapons of mass destruction. we end up with 4000 americans dead, $1.90 trillion from the war, and you tell me the issue is the surge? the issue was going into that country
. >>> japan's finance minister taro aso pushed his government's big fix for japan's economy at the diet on monday. he told lawmakers the details of the draft supplementary budget worth over $100 billion. the speech marks the start of debate with the opposition bloc over the government's key policy. prime minister shinzo abe has pledged to tackle japan's stubborn deflation and finally trigger economic revival. nhk world reports. >> translator: we must pull the country out of prolonged deflation. we also need to boost employment and income and regain a strong economy. these are the most important challenges facing this cabinet. >> reporter: the abe government is aiming to pass the extra budget this month. they have bundled the extra spending together with a record draft budget for the new fiscal year starting in april. they hope that combined spending of over $1 trillion will jolt the economy back to life. that approach is based on three pillars, bold monetary easing, flexible fiscal policy and a sustainable growth strategy. the diet sessions will deal with the fiscal policy pillar, a hug
in the technology industry where it was mentioned that between 2010 2010-2020, the american economy will annually create more than 120,000 additional computer or science jobs that were require at least a bachelors degree. that's just mention one aspect of this. this is great news for many of our computer science students. and for joy that is the end of the good news. each year only about 40,000 american students receive bachelor degrees in computer science. in other words, there are approximately 80,000 new computer science positions every year in the united states cannot be filled by available american workforce positions. and i have positions that need to be filled so that our technology industry can continue to thrive. simply put, u.s. based companies have a great need for those trained in the science, technology, engineering and math fields. but at least right now there are not enough americans trained and ready to fill these jobs. we cannot continue to simply hope that american companies do not move operations to countries where they have greater access for individuals trained in these s.t.e
expertise. >> after the competent -- after the break -- after the economy. after the break, the economy can transfer for the first time since the start of president obama's first term, and congressional republicans are quick to point the finger, except it was some of those very same lawmaker who's played a hand in the downturn. we will look at the new normal next on "now." [ male announcer ] how do you make america's favorite recipes? just begin with america's favorite soups. bring out chicken broccoli alfredo. or best-ever meatloaf. go to campbellskitchen.com for recipes, plus a valuable coupon. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. all stations come over to mithis is for real this time. step seven point two one two. verify and lock. command is locked. five seconds. three, two, one. standing by for capture. the most innovative software on the planet... dragon is captured. is connecting today's leading companies to places beyond it. siemens. answers. >>> yesterday the commerce department reported that the u.s. economy shrank for the first time in three and a half years. down .1%. amid
be a different story. >> i would remind you that three of mind -- six of mine, three of them were the economy. and that really stunned everybody. >> and even getting into this, this is the experience of the league of women voters, they sponsored the debate in 1976 and 1984 and for the sake of transparency i was one of the reporters that ask questions in 1984. when we finished with that, they pulled out of the sponsorship and argued at the time that there was too much party interference and they said that they had no intention of becoming an accessory to the hoodwinking of the american public. i think that this is terribly tough language, but my question this is overstated. >> but my question to you is not as moderators but as reporters. is this something where there may be the beginning of too cozy a relationship between the parties, and the public? >> i really don't -- i did a foreign policy debate and two of my sections were the middle east. are you going to talk about foreign policy without talking about the middle east? >> it is so obvious, why do this? >> if they don't want to do this, t
and down. and i think this has a lot to do with what i think you'll be talking about later, the economy is starting to rebound. people are slowly starting to get back into work. not looking dismal. they're not seeing the emergency measures for the economy like t.a.r.p. or the major stimulus and that has lowered the temperature on the right. in 2010 and 2011, when you looked at the republican party and when the republican party looked at itself, they thought, we are facing a permanent resolution on the right where if we don't vote this way, there will be another tea party challenger and another tea party challenger. although these efforts like karl rove's are getting started now, they're finding out there isn't an endless bench of tea party candidates that can win primaries. that has loosened it up for them to make a little bit of room on immigration reform. >> these election res important. they matter. and i think that republicans, you know, want to win senate seats. they want to win the presidency. >> political science 101, a party exit exists to get elected, right? >> but the question
on the rise again as the economy continues to falter. who will president obama blame for this latest set back? [bleep] [ applause ] >> and vice president joe biden admits that the new gun laws being proposed might not prevent another newtown. so what's really behind the gun control push? >> say it ain't so, joe, there you go again. >> caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone, the factor begins right now. hi, everyone. i'm laura ingraham in for bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. lionizing h ng. "newsweek" marks the most powerful woman in american history. the article reads like a piece of campaign literature than a serious examination of her record and her accomplishments. certainly, look, mrs. clinton is highly intelligent, she a global celebrate and she reached a level that few men, let alone women ever reach in our country. yet titles don't tell the entire story. the benghazi attack. a failed reset with russia. a more powerful and emboldened china. an iran closer to a nuclear weapon, slark terrorists fans out across north america? simply put, under barack obama and hilla
. the economy is deteriorating. you can come up with any excuses you like. hurricane sandy did, the republicans or lower defense spending but the fact is numbers are what they are. the economy is contracting. layoffs are at far too high a level. if you dig into today's report, in december the holiday period our spending in america went up only .2%. a deteriorating economy, bill. bill: that is paltry. the gdp number, help me understand because they explain the drop-off with cuts to defense spending, right? if that is the case, is it only federal spending that is keeping us going in any direction? >> hold on a second. there is always an excuse. over the past four years whenever the economy has turned sour there has been an excuse. the japanese tsunami. the egyptian arab spring, the europeans, trouble in japan, the republicans, the downgrade, hurricane sandy. drop-off in defense spending. there is always an excuse. the fact is, we have never achieved a robust expansion since the end of the recession. now this latest go round yesterday when the economy showed to be contracting it was blamed on lowe
war and 20 century popular culture. >> next common discussion in the u.s. economy and why some american could be holding back from investing or to trust issues concerning the government and financial site there. or "washington journal," this is 15 minutes. >> host: this history and for what "the wall street journal," chief economic correspondent. welcome. you wrote a piece saying how the trust deficit is hurting the economy. what we're trying to do? >> guest: we usually talk about things but budget deficits and trade deficits with things we can measure. what i'm talking about is the breakdown of trust in american society. it would take her in institutions that make our economy go. when you look at measures of trust from surveys by gallup for the pew institute that americans have, it's a very important institution including the media newspaper, television, congress, banks, large corporations, public school, public union. if all been going down for many years and allowed them, declining interest intensified leading up to and going into the financial crisis and there's a lot of re
of months. to be sure the economy created jobs but it's at a relatively modest pace. we had a report recently of a contraction in the nation's output in the fourth quarter of last year. increasingly you have people like laura tyson writing columns calling for the need for a plan for faster growth, not deficit reduction. what is the president -- i know you've talked about how all the president's plans envision job creation, but what does the president tell his advisors when he sees these signs of a sluggish recovery? what is he asking in the way of things to speed recovery, create jobs and stimulate growth? >> i'll go to the narrow question first. every time the president meets with his economic advisors to discuss policy proposals and refinements to existing policies, the focus is on job creation and economic growth. and that includes when we have discussions about deficit reduction. as i've said many times and as the president has made clear, deficit reduction is not a goal unto itself. it is a means to, if done right , the desired goal, which is greater growth and greater job creat
debate. >> there is no question that the economy is what the elections are about. but i would point out to the scholars that there were two chefs in public opinion during this campaign. the first one came after the first debate. when suddenly, here came romney and people said, that look like obama was going to run away with it, and the second change came at the end of the democratic convention, after the speech by bill clinton. these chefs do change minds and i think fat they are one of the best parts of the campaign process and i think that we need to have more debates. >> but let me say to the scholars, they overlook the obvious and maybe that is why they are scholars. [laughter] no, that is applied -- that is not a put down. scholars need to go beyond the obvious. that is what makes them scholars. what is obvious is that 64 million people watched the first debate. four years ago was about the same number and there was no two-one change like there was in 2012 of what the debates too, they are confirming exercises. and the scholars tend to say, they did not change any votes and as a co
to economies of scale. retirement income options would be current and former employees that have little incentive to do so. our defined contribution system is not perfect, but there's other things to make it substantively better. in conclusion we can increase coverage by creating a low-cost mechanism for small employers can benefit from the east of payroll deduction to fund a retirement savings account. we can encourage employers and ways for higher employer contribution rates. third, we can limit plant them for three can encourage the adoption of annuity options. thank you. >> thank you, dr. madrian. ask around the five-minute questions. i want you to know we are looking at the leakage problem and something i've become more aware of and hopefully this committee will be looking at the shortly. let me ask you -- share this retirement plan, a key open issue is that the contribution rate should be. those who have been working on developing this plan have thought about it not for social security between employer to give you contribution was some low threshold employer match and allowing an
enforcement in the 1970's, the men and women in the academy and then when they are out of the economy, the men and women are retrained on a monthly basis. they go to training. they go to the gun range. they are marksman. we have men and women that never pulled a service revolver. there has to be -- we do have gun-control in california. i do believe it does help, it really does help. i commend our senators and our president. newtown is a tragedy, a travesty. i have a granddaughter and there are young children who are our relatives. it does not make a difference. it could be young or old. we had a gentleman -- or rather a murderer from orange county, riverside county rather, the law enforcement gathered together. they were very emboldened and the economy in san diego. it tooks swap teams probably seven hours to get this man out. he had broken into a house and stole 30 guns, besides being a wanted murder. they did get him. i am proud of our men and women here in california. host: one more question. if the congress could do one thing, what would you like to see them do? caller: i would like to see
, is unconscionable. when we turn this economy around, and it will rebound, we need to end hunger now. we may not be able to wipe out all disease, we probably can't eliminate war, but we have the resources, we know what it takes. we need to muster the will to end hunger once and for all. hunger is a political condition. it's important to point out that even though 50 million people were food insecure, the vast majority had a safety net that prevented them from actually starving. that safety ned is called the supplement -- that safety net is called snap. snap is a program that provides low-income families with food they otherwise could not afford to buy. more than 75 million families relied on snap to provide food for their families. it is a lifeline for these 47 million people who struggle to make ends meet. i don't deny this is a big number, but it's a big number because it's a big problem. mr. speaker, america's hunger problem will be dramatically worse without snap. just imagine what this country would look like if we didn't have the safety net that snap provides for low-income families in
newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: former u.s. senator chuck hagel faced a hostile reception today from half of the committee that must sign off before he can become secretary of defense. his senate confirmation hearing centered heavily on criticism from his one-time republican colleagues. the atmosphere was friendly enough at the outset as chuck hagel began his big day before the armed services committee. he quickly sought to allay concerns on both sides about his positions on everything from iran to israel to nuclear weapons. >> no one individual vote, no one individual quote, no one individual statement defines me, my beliefs, o
department. we also didn't realize you were in charge of our economy. just this week, the new gross domestic product number came out, and it turned out here is the a.p. headline that said, defense cuts cause economy to shrink. a plunge in defense spending plummeted the economy into negative territory for the first time since mid-2009. nearly all the cuts were in services, maintenance, and personnel support. this is even before those automatic spending cuts kick in in march. these are the cuts that you guys agreed to back in 2011 that finally kicked in. what is going -- first of all, is the sequester going to happen? >> i certainly hope not. if congress stands back and allows sequester to take place, i think it would really be a shameful and irresponsible act. >> but are you preparing for it? >> we have to prepare for it because, you know, there are members up on the capitol hill that are saying, oh, no, we're going to stand back and let sequester happen. let me tell you, sequester happens, it is going to badly damage the readiness of the united states of america. we have the most powerful mi
new economy. by 2025 we could have 20 million jobs without enough college graduates to fill them. that's why at devry university we're teaming up with companies like cisco to help make sure everyone is ready with the know-how we need for a new tomorrow. [ male announcer ] make sure america's ready. make sure you're ready. at devry.edu/knowhow. ♪ ♪ [ music ] >> broadcasting across the nation, on your radio and on current tv. this is the bill press show. >> good morning, everyone. this is richard fowler stilling in for bill press on this fine friday morning. the start-off was going to be a grand super bowl weekend. i am pretty sure baltimore is anticipating what could be a win for them this weekend. but in other news i am here filling in for bill, and i am joined by bill's wonderful team who always makes me so welcome. i feel like i am home. >> richard welcome. >> we have peter there. >> there, man. >> dan, phil and cyprian working the cameras and phil getting those calls for us. listen, guys, i have got to tell you, there is a lot of stuff happeni
and the environment without talking about the economy. because it's job withs, it's growth -- it's jobs, it's growth, a nation's competitive position in the world. and so these issues are interrelated. and as my friends who are here representing their country, their people in america's capital tonight, they understand this, and they understand that the great global issues facing us all -- all 6.5 billion people on the face of the earth today -- are, in fact, global. we live in a global community. that global community is underpinned by a global economy. and so whatever framework of challenges you think we face, they are international. proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the environment, energy, terrorism, extremism and maybe the most insidious of all, despair. and within the framework of despair comes hunger and poverty and when man is without dignity, not much else matters. we know that. and there'll be a consequence. the human condition always drives the e events of history. the human condition will always dictate in the end how the world will respond to a challenge. i quote at the begin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 181 (some duplicates have been removed)